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What Are the Common Types of Tooth Extractions

tooth extractions Portland

Whether you are a current Hillsdale Orthodontics patient or are simply looking for an orthodontist in Portland to start orthodontic treatment with teeth braces, or maybe you need a tooth extraction or any other treatment, you must know that:

Orthodontic care requires careful coordination and cooperation between patients and specialists. Thankfully, our specialists are experts at their craft and enjoy working on achieving the best possible versions of a patient’s smile. Dr. Leemin and her experienced and friendly team members are happy to help patients achieve their perfect smiles and stay informed on everything that has to do with oral health.

Today, we will be touching base on the subject of tooth extractions, the types of tooth extractions, the procedure of having a tooth extracted, and everything in between. Don’t worry; we are here to help you every step of the way, no matter what procedure or treatment you need. 

Men and women who require a tooth extraction are frequently perplexed about whether they should seek treatment from a dentist or an oral surgeon. Having a tooth pulled isn’t something to take lightly or put off, so be sure you choose the correct type of practitioner for your circumstances.

Dentists and oral surgeons can extract teeth, although dentists may not have all the required tools to extract teeth in all situations. Let’s start. 

What Is a Tooth Extraction?

Simply put, tooth extraction is the process of removing a tooth from its socket.

Teeth require extraction by dentists and oral surgeons for a variety of reasons. Here are a few examples:

  • cavities in the teeth
  • periodontitis (gum disease)
  • infection of the teeth
  • Wisdom teeth difficulties can result from trauma or injury to the tooth or the surrounding bone.

If you suffer from severe tooth crowding and the baby teeth are not falling out at the appropriate age, preparation for a dental prosthesis is required.

Types of Tooth Extractions

Simple extraction and surgical extraction are the two basic types of dental extraction. Simple dental extractions are necessary to remove teeth that are visible and easily accessible.

In contrast, surgical dental extractions involve an incision into the connective tissue to access the tooth to be extracted. Below, we’ll go over both forms of tooth extractions in further depth.

The right type of tooth extraction depends on the tooth’s shape, size, position, and location in the mouth.

Simple Dental Extraction

Simple dental extraction entails the removal of visible teeth in the mouth. This technique is frequently performed in dental offices by general dentists, who use a local anesthetic to numb the area and lessen the patient’s pain.

An elevator and dental forceps are required to elevate and grab the visible area of the afflicted tooth. The elevator is used to loosen the tooth while the forceps grip it for extraction.

The tooth can then be pushed back and forth until the periodontal ligament breaks, removing the tooth from the alveolar bone. This necessitates using dental forceps to deliver a controlled force to the tooth while maintaining constant pressure.

Surgical Dental Extraction

Surgical dental extraction entails the removal of teeth that are difficult to reach from within the mouth. This could be because they haven’t fully erupted through the gums or cracked beneath the gum line.

In this scenario, an incision into the connective tissue around the tooth is necessary to access it for extraction. For example, the soft tissues surrounding the tooth may be raised, or a drill or osteotome may be required to remove some of the neighboring jawbones during the extraction procedure.

Your oral surgeon may actually need to fracture your tooth into multiple pieces before extracting it in many surgical and dental extraction situations.

An oral surgeon often performs surgical and dental extractions under general anesthesia in a dental hospital environment due to the more challenging nature of the surgery and its discomfort. However, a regular dentist may be able to do the treatment in some situations.

Do I Need a Dentist or Oral Surgeon? 

If you’re having any problems with your teeth, the first thing you should do is call your orthodontist or dentist. They will assess the situation to see if an extraction is necessary and whether it’s possible to perform the surgery in the office. X-rays and an examination of the problematic tooth or teeth are usually necessary during this visit.

Your orthodontist will determine whether or not they can do the extraction or whether you need to be referred to an oral surgeon. Most dentists can remove a tooth using Novocain or local anesthetic directly in the office, sometimes even at the same time as your appointment. If t an oral surgeon is required, most practices have relationships with oral surgeons and can quickly send patients.

Pain Management During Tooth Extraction

A local anesthetic injection may be the preferred method of area-numbing by most economical dentists to accomplish minor tooth extractions. You may receive an oral sedative or conscious sedation if you are nervous. General anesthesia or severe sedation may be necessary for surgical extractions. You may also receive steroid tablets to assist in reducing inflammation in addition to pain relievers. If you experience any discomfort during the procedure, notify your dentist.

After Your Tooth Extraction

After most extractions, you should expect to feel some discomfort. Take your pain medication exactly as advised. It’s also possible that there will be some bleeding. Pain and swelling could lessen with the use of ice packs. Within the first 24 hours after an extraction, never spit or use a straw; this might dislodge the freshly formed blood clot and produce a painful condition called a dry socket. Dry socket symptoms can be alleviated with the application of medicated dressings. Contact your dentist or oral surgeon if your pain, bleeding, or other symptoms worsen or remain after a few days.

When Eating, Be Cautious.

Drink plenty of water and consume soft, nourishing foods after tooth extraction.

Slowly reintroduce solid foods once chewing has returned to normal. The dentist will recommend chewing on the side opposite the extraction site until the area has healed completely.

Flossing and Brushing

After tooth extraction, brush and floss as usual, but be careful not to disturb the blood clotting. You can also rinse with warm salt water every few hours starting the day following surgery. Add half a teaspoon of salt to 1 cup of water to make this.

Schedule an Appointment

Tooth extractions can be stressful. But that’s why we are here. If you think you need a tooth extraction but are unsure or would like Dr. Leemin to take a look, schedule an appointment with us today! We will be happy to welcome you to our office and help you achieve your dental goals.

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Dr. Alix J. Leemin DMD, MS

Dr. Alix J. Leemin DMD, MS

As a nutty overachiever, Dr. Leemin never lost sight of her childhood dreams of becoming a smartypants orthodontist. After graduating from Stanford University with a Bachelor of Arts with Honors, she embarked on her career in dentistry at the University of Pennsylvania, where she graduated #1 in her class. Feeling just a little too ambitious, she then completed 2.5 years of additional training at OHSU to become an orthodontic specialist.

Stanford University – Bachelor of Arts with Honors
Univ. of Pennsylvania – Doctor of Dental Medicine
Oregon Health & Science Univ. – Master of Science
Oregon Health & Science Univ. – Certificate in Orthodontics

Dr. Alix J. Leemin DMD, MS

Dr. Alix J. Leemin DMD, MS

As a nutty overachiever, Dr. Leemin never lost sight of her childhood dreams of becoming a smartypants orthodontist. After graduating from Stanford University with a Bachelor of Arts with Honors, she embarked on her career in dentistry at the University of Pennsylvania, where she graduated #1 in her class. Feeling just a little too ambitious, she then completed 2.5 years of additional training at OHSU to become an orthodontic specialist.

Stanford University – Bachelor of Arts with Honors
Univ. of Pennsylvania – Doctor of Dental Medicine
Oregon Health & Science Univ. – Master of Science
Oregon Health & Science Univ. – Certificate in Orthodontics